PICTURED: Philadelphia boy, 18, murdered by Nike executive Larry Miller in 1965

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The 18-year-old murdered by Nike executive Jordan Larry Miller in 1965 has been photographed for the first time, as his family revealed they had forgiven his killer.

Edward White’s family have shared photos of the teenager as they reveal that Miller did not tell them in advance that he planned to disclose what he had been up to before the publication of an autobiography detailing The crime.

White, a father-of-two, was pictured in a haunting black and white tribute photo shared by his daughter Azizah Arline, inscribed with a caption saying “Always thinking of you”.

Another photograph shows White, taken because he was in the wrong place at the wrong time, smiling and waving in a kitchen while wearing a plaid shirt.

Edward White

Edward White, pictured above, was murdered by Nike executive Larry Miller in Philadelphia in 1965. The 18-year-old was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Miller, 72, who published a book detailing the murder earlier this year after revealing he killed White in October, told CNN on Monday that if felt guilt for the gang-related murder every day for the past 56 years, he was also filled with regret that he had not contacted the family of the dead before going public with the secret.

The successful entrepreneur, who served four and a half years in prison for second-degree murder, admitted he should have contacted the family about his plans to publish Jump: My Secret Journey from the Streets to the Boardroom .

He told the New York Times last month which he held back because he “was nervous about it, I was anxious about it”.

He has now told CNN he is protecting the family’s privacy. DailyMail.com has reached out to White’s sister, son and daughter for further comment.

“We’re definitely trying to connect with them and make sure they’re feeling some healing as well,” said the founder of the shoe company’s Jordanian faction – and a close friend of its namesake Michael Jordan – the outlet said in an exclusive interview.

“You know, for me, if we can find a way to commemorate Mr White, so he’s not someone who’s just forgotten, then that would be positive.”

Nike executive Larry Miller has admitted he didn't tell the family of the boy he murdered on the streets of West Philadelphia in 1965 that he was publishing a book about the murder.

Nike executive Larry Miller has admitted he didn’t tell the family of the boy he murdered on the streets of West Philadelphia in 1965 that he was publishing a book about the murder.

Miller was 16 when he killed White in a gang-related shooting at the corner of 53rd Street and Locust Streets on the night of September 30, 1965.

He served just 4.5 years for the crime and has since seen his career as a business executive blossom to astronomical heights.

Miller has met with White’s relatives only twice since he spoke about the murder late last year in an interview with Sports Illustrated, a family lawyer told the outlet.

According to Philadelphia-based trial attorney Ronald Marrero, at the last of those meetings in January, Miller apologized for not reaching out before the book was published, to which White’s sister Barbara Mack replied that she had forgiven the business mogul, who served as president of the Portland Trailblazers from 2007 to 2012.

During the meeting, held at Marrero’s office, Mack, 84, said, “I have to forgive to be forgiven,” according to the attorney.

Miller was 16 when he killed White in a gang-related shootout at 53rd and Locust streets in West Philadelphia (pictured) on the night of September 30, 1965

Miller was 16 when he killed White in a gang-related shootout at 53rd and Locust streets in West Philadelphia (pictured) on the night of September 30, 1965

Miller decided to share his story in the new book Jump: My Secret Journey from the Streets to the Boardroom which he co-wrote with his daughter, Laila Lacy.  He acknowledged on Monday that he should have contacted the family about his plans to publish Jump: My Secret Journey from the Streets to the Boardroom, after telling The New York Times last month that he waited because he was nervous about it, I was anxious about it'

Miller decided to share his story in the new book Jump: My Secret Journey from the Streets to the Boardroom which he co-wrote with his daughter, Laila Lacy. He acknowledged on Monday that he should have contacted the family about his plans to publish Jump: My Secret Journey from the Streets to the Boardroom, after telling The New York Times last month that he waited because he was nervous about it, I was anxious about it’

Mack said at the first meeting that she read Miller a letter about her younger brother, telling him about White’s twin sister, young son, and baby on the way to when he was killed.

She also opened up to Miller about her younger brother’s job at a restaurant, the fact that he had undergone Job Corps training, and all of his “swag” — which included his love of fedoras and The Temptations.

Mack told The Times that she chose to forgive Miller for the murder because “if I didn’t forgive him, God wouldn’t forgive me.”

According to Mack, Miller apologized and cried throughout the meeting and at the end when he asked if he could hug her, she agreed but said “If I was 30 less, I would have been on the other side of that table.”

Miller has met with White's loved ones only twice since he spoke about the murder late last year in an interview with Sports Illustrated, and has been pardoned by members of what the attorney for the family revealed.

Miller has met with White’s relatives only twice since he spoke about the murder late last year in an interview with Sports Illustrated, a family attorney has revealed. During the last of those meetings, in January, Miller was forgiven by family members

Miller says he took to the streets drunk and seeking revenge after a friend and gang member of his was fatally stabbed by a member of the rival 53rd and Pine gang.

The business tycoon didn’t know White but wanted to avenge the murder of another gang member and says he ended up shooting and killing the first person he saw.

White did nothing to provoke it and died instantly after being shot with a .38 Miller got from his girlfriend.

Miller decided to share his story in his book, which he co-wrote with his daughter, Laila Lacy.

Miller told The Times he hoped the reunion would allow White’s family to feel their “remorse and sadness for what had happened”, and said Mack’s comments about coming after him if she was youngerwas an appropriate comment from my point of view.

Mack told The Times that she did not attend the second meeting last week where preliminary talks about forming a scholarship foundation in White’s name were discussed because “I don’t I don’t need to see him anymore.”

The foundation would help White’s family members and others attend college and trade school and, according to White’s daughter, Azizah Arline, would ensure that her father ‘did not die in vain.’

Miller said that while the details weren’t ironed out, “I think we agreed that we wanted to do something that lets his name live on and something that’s also a benefit and a positive for the other people who come from our community.”

Arline told The Times that she plans to hold Miller accountable.

Miller, 72, has since had a successful career, now the founder of the shoe company's Jordan faction - and a close friend of his namesake Michael Jordan

Miller, 72, has since had a successful career, now the founder of the shoe company’s Jordan faction – and a close friend of his namesake Michael Jordan

“I will call him on the mat every time,” she said, to make sure “that legacy for my dad comes to fruition.”

Arline also took back the letter she read to Miller at the meeting, in which she said “it wasn’t fair,” that she never got to meet her dad, or “see him smile. or hear his voice”, to have him ‘give me to my wedding’ or to see him greet his grandchildren.

She told him how her mother had planned to marry White, but was instead forced to be a single mother struggling to make ends meet.

She added that learning the details of his death was “like we lost him twice in a lifetime”.

White’s 56-year-old son Hasan Adams said he also forgave Miller.

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