That’s pretty close to top scores for the kit away from Southampton here, while the Magpies are due to stick around after classes for their home strip philipkofler / pixabay

Arsenal

A way

The Gunners opted for a retro-inspired kit for their away gang this season, swapping their usual badge for a simple cannon design. The crest looks great and I don’t hate the pastel yellow color. They retain the sponsor of the Emirates jersey, a perennial feature of Arsenal kits since 2004, as well as the controversial Visit Rwanda branding on the sleeve. A solid kit, which Arsenal fans hope to accompany with a more solid performance than the disappointing 8th place last season.

Category B

Brighton

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I was a huge fan of Brighton’s home kit last year, the pronounced white collar paired with a mostly navy stripe, albeit with white stripes. This year, the kit designers did another stellar, albeit simple, job with the house tape. Returning from last year’s thin white stripes, the 2021 kit is a more traditional Brighton kit, with big white and blue stripes. Nike’s yellow swoosh stands out nicely and sponsor American Express isn’t too obnoxious. Football fans are often split over bands that look like V-necks, but I personally think it looks good in this case.

Rating: B +

Chelsea

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The recent history of Chelsea’s ugly kits (last year’s third strip, for example) continues with this rather disastrous home strip attempt. Blue and yellow work quite well and have looked great on Chelsea kits in the past (2005/06, for example). The primary problem with this kit is the bizarre patterns, the overlapping zig-zags with a chessboard pattern on the shoulder. It looks like Chelsea are trying to force a ‘cult’ kit (think Mexico City ’98 or Arsenal ’93) by using designs on the jersey, but the overall effect misses the mark somewhat.

Grade: C-

Crystal Palace

A way

This may be a divisive opinion, but I like this kit. The yellow is a bit of a sight for sore eyes, but the red and blue stripe on one side looks good, and the sponsor fits in well with the kit. The blue trim on the sleeves completes the look, although I wish the yellow was a little less shiny.

Category B

Everton

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I’ve always had a soft spot for Hummel football shirts, but in my mind Everton’s home kit is narrowly lacking. I can’t quite put my finger on why, but it sounds like a training kit to me. Blue is a lovely shade, but the odd line that separates the shirt leaves a lot to be desired. The pattern is known as “glare,” which has strong ties to Merseyside, as it was used to paint warships during WWI as a method of camouflage. The zebra crossing-esque pattern on the shoulders is an odd choice, but the yellow trim on the sleeves looks great.

Category B-

A way

It’s more like that! Mostly black with an orange belt across the chest, this is a bold kit that looks a lot less like a workout band than the homemade kit. I wish, however, that the belt was not interrupted by the sponsor.

Rating: B +

Leicester

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In my opinion, it’s hard to go wrong with a navy blue kit, and the texture of Leicester’s new kit is stunning. The white and gold V-neck works well and the same colors are reflected on the sleeve cuffs. The sponsor is important but harmless, and overall it’s a nice strip. Look at James Maddison’s tattoos, I spotted the Frozen snowman and some poker chips… Questionable to say the least.

Rating: B +

Liverpool

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Not a fan. Orange and red on a football kit should only be reserved for AS Roma, to begin with. The material also leaves some questions unanswered; if you zoom in on the image there are a lot of holes, probably an embodiment of “breathable technology”. It doesn’t look great anyway. A disappointment, if I’m being honest.

Category B-

A way

It’s a shame they used the same material for this one, because otherwise it’s a thing of beauty. The body of the kit is cream, which goes well with the green collar and trim. As a soccer jersey puritan, a classic collar makes me very happy, and it combines modern colors with a more traditional pattern.

Note: A-

Newcastle

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Perhaps the worst yet. Newcastle United kits need black and white stripes, in my opinion, and it’s more of a block color stripe. The collar screams 2011 Topman t-shirts, and the sponsor jumps out at you more than anything else. See if you can spot the massive number four on the front of the shirt (hint: it’s not very difficult).

Rating: D

Norwich

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It’s hard to design a nice kit where the primary colors are bright yellow and green, but it’s not the worst Norwich kit I’ve seen. The Lotus Sponsor is clean and the details on the sleeves are eye-catching without being overdone. Regarding the Norwich kits, very solid.

Category B

Southampton

A way

My choice of the group. Hummel again, but more tasteful than the two Everton kits. Black and orange go really well together, and I love the style of collar they used. The details are even more impressive, with football fields sewn into the fabric of the web. My only qualms are the sponsor whose logo is quite ugly. Anyway, a nice kit in my eyes.

Note: A

Tottenham

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Honestly, I don’t know what I can write about this kit. It’s white, it’s made by Nike and it’s a Tottenham kit. Very boring. Solid, but boring.

Category B



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